“I like to mix form, light, reflection and texture. I do this by layering and adding other elements such as clear acrylic rods and reflective backgrounds. While the viewer cannot know the simple and sometimes complex stories behind each piece, they can reconsider their perceptions of neon and the world around them. When I look at a neon tube, I don’t see a sign even if it is. I see a luminous glow. I want to share the beauty and playfulness of neon.”   Linda Sue Price

Miata and I

I have been looking at and admiring neon since I was a child living and traveling through the western states. The intense colors and glow of the motel and business signs appealed to me and I thought they were beautiful. A visit to Las Vegas was always special because of extensive use of neon all over the buildings. There was a palm tree in front of one of casinos that I loved. In Southern California, there were special signs that I looked forward to seeing. Long Beach had a drive-in theatre near the traffic circle that had wonderful neon. Motel signs often had animation. I liked to look at them and try to figure out the animation patterns.  

cu studio

I started working with neon as an art media in 2004. I took a neon class through the Museum of Neon Art taught by Michael Flechtner. I wanted to explore a free form style and he encouraged me to try bending. I began studying the craft of bending with Flechtner in 2005.

ws studio



Photos by Erin Stone